Dr. Joanne Cacciatore

Joanne Cacciatore (@dr_cacciatore) is an Associate Professor at Arizona State University in the School of Social Work and a counselor specializing in traumatic losses, most often the death of a child.

She is the founder and president of the international nonprofit organization, the MISS Foundation, providing counseling, advocacy, research, and education services to families experiencing the death of a child, and co-founder of the Selah Care Farm, the world’s first ever care farm dealing exclusively with traumatic grief.

As well as having her research published in a various peer reviewed journals she is the author “Bearing the Unbearable: Love, Loss, and the Heartbreaking Path of Grief” which won the 2017 Indies Book of the Year Award in self-help and made it into Oprah’s Basket of Favorite Things!

In today’s episode we discuss traumatic grief, and more specifically the experience of losing a child. Joanne shares her own experience of losing her baby daughter, and how this fuelled her desire to help other families going through the same.

Along the way we discuss how losing a child affects the family dynamic and issues such as blame, the importance of grieving rituals, the DSM 5’s misguided approach to grief, and how family and friends can best support a loved one dealing with such an unbearable personal tragedy.

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Related Links

Center for Loss and Trauma – Joanne’s main website

Dr. Joanne Cacciatore’s Facebook Page

The MISS Foundation – A community of compassion and hope for grieving families

Selah Care Farm – The world’s first care farm dedicated to helping those enduring traumatic grief

The National Organisation of Parents of Murdered Children – For the families and friends of those who have died of violence

The Compassionate Friends – Supporting family after a child dies

Book Recommendations

Image courtesy: Paul Sableman

Dr. Vincent J. Felitti

Vincent Felitti is a Clinical Professor of Medicine at University of California, San Diego, and the founder of the Department of Preventive Medicine for Kaiser Permanente, where he served as the chief of preventive medicine for 26 years, during which time his department provided comprehensive medical evaluations to 1.1 million individuals, becoming the largest single-site medical evaluation facility in the western world.

Dr. Felitti has also served on advisory committees at the Institute of Medicine and the American Psychiatric Association.

But he is perhaps most famous for being co-principal investigator of the world famous Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study, a long-term, in-depth, analysis of over 17,000 adults investigating how our emotional experiences during childhood relate to and possibly influence our physical and mental health as adults.

In today’s episode we discuss the history and origins of the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study, how childhood trauma can later manifest as physical illness such as cancer and heart disease, why things like obesity and smoking are often protective reactions to childhood trauma, how people with an ACE score 6 or higher have a 5000% greater risk of suicide, and how doctors and mental health professionals can better care for people suffering the consequences of childhood trauma. 

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Related Links

ACEs Connection – the most active, influential ACEs community in the world.

ACES Too High – a news site that reports on research about adverse childhood experiences, including developments in epidemiology, neurobiology, and the biomedical and epigenetic consequences of toxic stress.

Book Recommendations

                    

Image courtesy: Linus Eklund

Prof. Yoel Inbar

Yoel Inbar (@yorl) is Assistant Professor of Psychology at the University of Toronto whose research concerns the interplay between rational, deliberate analysis, and intuitive, emotional reactions and how these two kinds of thinking influence people’s beliefs, actions, and choices.

He is the co-author dozens of journal articles and book chapters, including the one which inspired today’s episode, “Political Diversity in Social and Personality Psychology“.

Yoel is associate editor of “Collabra: Psychology“, the official journal of the Society for the Improvement of Psychological Science, and sits on the editorial board for the journal “Social Psychological and Personality Science“.

He is also the co-host of “Two Psychologists Four Beers” podcast in which Yoel and fellow psychologist Michael Inzlicht (@minzlicht) drink at least four beers while discussing news and controversies in science, academia, and beyond.

In today’s episode we discuss why Social and Personality Psychology is dominated by political liberals, how one-in-three academic psychologists admit that they would willingly discriminate against their conservative colleagues, how ideological homogeneity affects psychological research, the benefits of encouraging more diversity of thought, and how to make the field of psychology more welcoming to political conservatives.

This episode has 12 minutes of bonus content! Subscribe for as little as $2 /month to gain access to this and other exclusive content.

Related Links

YoelInbar.net – Yoel’s website

Political Diversity in Social and Personality Psychology – 2012 Paper by Yoel Inbar and Joris Lammers

Two Psychologists Four Beers podcast

Book Recommendations

          

Image courtesy: Wikimedia

Dr. John Norcross

Dr. John Norcross (@JohnCNorcross) is a board-certified clinical psychologist, and internationally recognized expert on behavior change and New Year’s resolutions.

He is Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the University of Scranton, Clinical Professor at The Commonwealth Medical College, and Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry at SUNY Upstate Medical University.

He is the recipient of a number of awards including Pennsylvania Professor of the Year from the Carnegie Foundation, Distinguished Contributions to Education & Training Award from the American Psychological Association, and election to the National Academies of Practice.

John, has authored over 400 publications and edited or co-written 22 professional books in the areas of psychotherapy, clinical psychology, and self-change including “Changing for Good“, “Self-Help That Works“, and “Changeology: 5 Steps to Realizing Your Goals and Resolutions“.

In today’s episode, with 2019 looming, we explore the science of personal change and the most effective ways to plan, commence and – most importantly – stick to(!) your news years resolutions.

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Related Links

ChangeologyBook.com – John’s website.

Check out some of John’s free self-assessment and self-change exercises.

The New Year’s Resolution Solution – A great article summarizing John’s advice when it comes to planning, starting, and sticking to new years resolutions.

Book Recommendations

      

Image courtesy: Marco Verch

Dr. Stephen Diamond

Dr. Stephen Diamond is a practicing clinical and forensic psychologist specializing in the psychology of creativity, evil, trauma, spirituality and existential life crises.

He is a resident faculty member in the Department of Graduate Psychology at Ryokan College in Los Angeles, and is currently guest editor of the Journal of Humanistic Psychology.

As well as writing a regular blog for Psychology Today, “Evil Deeds: A forensic psychologist on anger, madness and destructive behavior”, Stephen is the author of “Anger, Madness, and the Daimonic: The Psychological Genesis of Violence, Evil, and Creativity”.

Dr. Diamond currently maintains a private psychotherapy practice near Beverly Hills, specializing primarily in Existential Depth Psychology, a unique approach to treatment developed over the past four decades of his career, which he describes as a synthesis of psychodynamic, Jungian and existential therapy.

In this years Christmas episode we explore the issue of bitterness – and the proposed diagnosis of Post-Traumatic Embitterment Disorder (PTED) – by examining the character and story arc of Ebenezer Scrooge from the famous Charles Dickens Christmas tale “A Christmas Carol”.

Along the way we discuss issues related to bitterness such as childhood trauma, romance, grief, nostalgia, meaning, mortality, and personal redemption.

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Related Links

Evil Deeds – A forensic psychologist on anger, madness and destructive behavior

DrStephenDiamond.com – The website of Dr. Stephen Diamond, clinical and forensic psychologist.

Book Recommendations

          

Image courtesy: Internet Archive Book Images

Prof. Patrick Corrigan

Patrick Corrigan is Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, where his research examines psychiatric disability and social disadvantage.

He is principal investigator of both the National Consortium for Stigma and Empowerment, a collaboration of investigators and advocates from more than a dozen institutions, and the Chicago Health Disparities Center examining how ethnic and income disparities further lessen the opportunities of those with serious mental illness.

Pat has written more than 400 peer-reviewed articles, is the editor emeritus of the American Journal of Psychiatric Rehabilitation, the editor the American Psychiatric Association journal Stigma and Health, and he has authored or edited seventeen books, including the book which forms the basis of today’s conversation, “The Stigma Effect: Unintended Consequences of Mental Health Campaigns“.

In today’s episode we explore the origins of stigma and the various ways it tends to manifest, whether there is any truth in the stereotypes of people with mental illness being dangerous and/or incompetent, examples of anti-stigma campaigns that are either ineffective or counterproductive and some more effective alternatives, and why mental health professionals should step aside and allow people with lived experience to lead the charge against stigma.

This episode has 12 minutes of bonus content! Subscribe for as little as $2 /month to gain access to this and other exclusive content.

Related Links

Coming Out Proud – The Honest, Open, Proud (HOP) Program, reducing the self-stigma associated with mental illness.

Book Recommendations

               

Image courtesy: Christian Siedler

Dr. Tomasz Witkowski

Tomasz Witkowski is a psychologist, skeptic and science writer who specializes in debunking pseudoscience in the fields of psychology, psychotherapy, and diagnostics.

He is the founder of the Polish Skeptics Club, a non-profit, non-governmental organisation actively engaged in the promotion of critical thinking, scientific skepticism and scientific methods, and in 2010 he was the recipient of the “Rationalist of the Year Award” from the Polish Society of Rationalists.

As well as running his own “Forbidden Psychology” blog and making regular contributions to the British Psychological Societies’ Research Digest, Tom has authored 200 popular science pieces, 40 scientific articles, and over a dozen books including the two which form the basis of today’s discussion, “Psychology Gone Wrong: The Dark Sides of Science and Therapy” and “Psychology Led Astray: Cargo Cult in Science and Therapy”.

In today’s episode we discuss why the results of almost half of all psychological studies are false or misleading, why 7% of academics in the field admit to fabricating data, why psychology journals are unwilling to publish negative study results and the effect this has on subsequent research, why the increase in mental health professionals results in worsening mental health statistics, and ultimately why the field of psychological research is merely a pale imitation of real science.

This episode has 12 minutes of bonus content! Subscribe for as little as $2 /month to gain access to this and other exclusive content.

 

Related Links

Forbidden Psychology – The Dark Sides of Science and Therapy

Psychology Gone Wrong – Facebook Page

Book Recommendations

                              

Image courtesy: dierk schaefer

Dr. Nassir Ghaemi

Nassir Ghaemi (@nassirghaemi) is a psychiatrist and researcher specializing in depression and bipolar illness.

He is Professor of Psychiatry at Tufts Medical Center in Boston, a Lecturer on Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and a Distinguished Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association.

He has published over 200 scientific articles, over 50 scientific book chapters, and has written or edited over half a dozen books, including the book which forms the basis of today’s discussion, the New York Times Best-Seller “A First Rate Madness: Uncovering the Links Between Leadership and Mental Illness”.

In today’s episode we discuss the subject of Psychobiography and the methods involved in learning to understand the psychology of historical figures, we explore the link between manic depressive illness and leadership through examples such as Abraham Lincoln and Winston Churchill, why mentally normal politicians make for good peacetime leaders but poor crisis leaders, and how people with mental illness can learn to channel their illness into something positive.

Related Links

NassirGhaemi.com – Nassir’s web site

Mood Swings – Nassir’s blog at Psychology Today

Book Recommendations

Image courtesy: Nasir Ghaemi / Penguin Press / Nicole Laroche

Prof. Graham Davey

Graham Davey (@GrahamCLDavey) is Emeritus Professor of Psychology at the University of Sussex.

Graham has published over 140 articles in scientific and professional journals, has served as President of the British Psychological Society, and is currently Editor-in-Chief of Journal of Experimental Psychopathology and Psychopathology Review.

He is the author of the Psychology Today blog “Why We Worry”, and he has written or edited a number of books including “Worry and its Psychological Disorders”, “Managing Anxiety with CBT For Dummies”, and the book which forms the basis of today’s discussion, “The Anxiety Epidemic: The Causes of our Modern-Day Anxieties”.

In today’s episode we discuss the difference between anxiety disorder and plain old worry, the evolutionary origins and advantages of anxiety, how the nature of our anxiety has changed across the generations, why anxiety tends to manifest in different ways in different people, common causes of anxiety in the modern world and whether or not there really is an epidemic, and of course some tips and advice on what you can do to reduce your own anxiety.

This episode has 10 minutes of bonus content! Subscribe for as little as $2 /month to gain access to this and other exclusive content.

Related Links

Papers from Sidcup – Graham’s website

Why We Worry: Where anxiety comes from and what we can do about it – Graham’s blog at Psychology Today

Contact Graham Direct: grahamda@sussex.ac.uk

The English Malady by George Cheyne via Archive.org

Book Recommendations

                    

Image courtesy: Mark Turnauckas

Mark Hunter

Mark Hunter (@chimairamark) is a musician and photographer who spent almost two decades as the vocalist and one of the main songwriters for the heavy metal band Chimaira, a group which has sold more than a million albums worldwide and has debuted on the Billboard 200 Chart six times.

Marks latest project, in collaboration with award winning director Nick Cavalier, is a documentary film entitled “Down Again” in which Mark shares his personal story about utilizing art to combat personal struggles, which in his case includes depression and bipolar disorder.

In today’s episode we discuss Mark’s journey from a heavy metal fan to a heavy metal icon, his experience with a specific form of bipolar know as “hypomania”, the relationship between art and mental illness, the power of music to both represent and relieve emotional distress, the evolution of Mark’s artistic expression from music to photography, and whether of not creativity inspired by personal darkness is worth the price of admission.

Related Links

Mark Hunter Photo – Mark’s photography website

Down Again – A film exploring the connection between mental illness and creativity told through the lens of photographer and Chimaira frontman Mark Hunter.

@markhunterphoto – Mark’s Instagram page

Music Recommendations

               

Image courtesy: Nick Cavalier