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Prof. Patrick Corrigan

Patrick Corrigan is Distinguished Professor of Psychology at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago, where his research examines psychiatric disability and social disadvantage.

He is principal investigator of both the National Consortium for Stigma and Empowerment, a collaboration of investigators and advocates from more than a dozen institutions, and the Chicago Health Disparities Center examining how ethnic and income disparities further lessen the opportunities of those with serious mental illness.

Pat has written more than 400 peer-reviewed articles, is the editor emeritus of the American Journal of Psychiatric Rehabilitation, the editor the American Psychiatric Association journal Stigma and Health, and he has authored or edited seventeen books, including the book which forms the basis of today’s conversation, “The Stigma Effect: Unintended Consequences of Mental Health Campaigns“.

In today’s episode we explore the origins of stigma and the various ways it tends to manifest, whether there is any truth in the stereotypes of people with mental illness being dangerous and/or incompetent, examples of anti-stigma campaigns that are either ineffective or counterproductive and some more effective alternatives, and why mental health professionals should step aside and allow people with lived experience to lead the charge against stigma.

This episode has 12 minutes of bonus content! Subscribe for as little as $2 /month to gain access to this and other exclusive content.

Related Links

Coming Out Proud – The Honest, Open, Proud (HOP) Program, reducing the self-stigma associated with mental illness.

Book Recommendations

               

Image courtesy: Christian Siedler

DJ Jaffe

D.J. Jaffe (@MentalIllPolicy) is a writer and activist whose work is focused on improving care for the 4% of people who are the most severely mentally ill, including those with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

D.J. is the founder and Executive Director of Mental Illness Policy Org, a think-tank dedicated to providing law enforcement, the media and policy makers with unbiased information on issues affecting the seriously mentally ill.

His op-eds have appeared in the New York Times, Washington Post, Wall St. Journal, and he is the author of the controversial and well-reviewed, “Insane Consequences: How the Mental Health Industry Fails the Mentally Ill“.

In today’s episode we discuss the distinctions between serious and non-serious mental illness, why anti-stigma and anti-suicide campaigns are misguided, the damaging myths about serious mental illness perpetuated by the media, and ultimately how mental health advocates are failing the very people they profess to be trying to help.

 

Related Links

Mental Illness Policy Org – Homepage

8 Myths About Mental Illness – by D.J. Jaffe

Mental Illness Policy Org – Facebook Page

National Alliance on Serious Mental Illness – Facebook Group

Book Recommendations

                                   

Image courtesy: MJ Klaver

 

Prof. Elyn Saks

When Elyn Saks was diagnosed with chronic schizophrenia as a young women, the doctors gave her a prognosis of “grave”. In other words, at best she could expect to live in residential care, and work at menial jobs.

Today, Elyn Saks is Professor of Law, Psychology, and Psychiatry and the Behavioral Sciences at the University of Southern California Gould School of Law; Adjunct Professor of Psychiatry at the University of California, San Diego, School of Medicine; and Faculty at the New Center for Psychoanalysis.

She’s the author of four books related to mental health, including her best-selling 2007 memoir “The Center Cannot Hold: My Journey Through Madness“.

In 2009 she was awarded a fellowship by the MacArthur Foundation, a $500,000 prize commonly referred to as the genius grant, which she used to establish the Institute for Mental Health Law, Policy, and Ethics, at USC, and her 2012 TED talk “A tale of mental illness – from the inside“, is fast approaching 3 million views. There’s even an opera based on her memoir.

In today’s episode we discuss what it like to have schizophrenia, the nature and content of delusions and hallucinations, Elyn’s experience in psychiatric hospitals in both the US and UK and how they differed, the stigma associated with schizophrenia and whether or not the name should be changed to something less stigmatizing, we talk about Elyn’s study of high functioning people with schizophrenia, such as PhD candidates, teachers, CEOs, and how a parrot played a pivotal role in Elyn eventually finding love.

Elyn’s Website: The Saks Institute

Special thanks to Chris Schneider, Program Associate at the Saks Institute, for fixing all our technical glitches while recording.

 

Elyn’s Recommended Links

Supported decision-making for people with mental illness – Saks Institute research

Bring Change 2 Mind – Non-profit organization working together to end the stigma and discrimination surrounding mental illness

Books Mentioned in This Episode

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Image courtesy: Christiaan Tonnis