Posts

David Pickup, LMFT

David Pickup, LMFT (@davidpickupmft) is a Licensed Marriage & Family Therapist, and Reintegrative Therapist with a clinical practice in Addison, Texas.

As well as being a member of the American Psychological Association, and the California Association of Marriage and Family Therapists, David is a Board member for both the Alliance for Therapeutic Choice and Scientific Integrity, and the National Association for Research and Therapy of Homosexuality (NARTH).

In today’s episode we discuss the difference between reintegrative therapy and gay conversion therapy, whether or not homosexual feelings are innate or the result of socialization or trauma, how reintegrative therapy supposedly works, the quality (or lack thereof) of studies supporting these kinds of therapies, and whether or not therapies addressing homosexual feelings should be banned.

 

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Related Links

David Pickup, LMFT – David’s website

Sexual Orientation, Controversy, and Science – In-depth 2017 report by J. Michael Bailey

Journal of Human Sexuality – the official publication of the Alliance for Therapeutic Choice and Scientific Integrity (ATCSI)

Psychiatry Giant Sorry for Backing Gay ‘Cure’ – New York Times article on Robert Spitzer

Man who worked as top ‘conversion therapist’ comes out as gay – Guardian Story on David Matheson

Book Recommendations

 

I feel compelled to add here that I’m only recommending the “Preventing Homosexuality” book because the author, Joseph Nicolosi, is kinda the godfather of this sort of therapy, so it might prove an interesting, if not particularly scientific, read.

Image courtesy: karendesuyo

Dr. Joanne Cacciatore

Joanne Cacciatore (@dr_cacciatore) is an Associate Professor at Arizona State University in the School of Social Work and a counselor specializing in traumatic losses, most often the death of a child.

She is the founder and president of the international nonprofit organization, the MISS Foundation, providing counseling, advocacy, research, and education services to families experiencing the death of a child, and co-founder of the Selah Care Farm, the world’s first ever care farm dealing exclusively with traumatic grief.

As well as having her research published in a various peer reviewed journals she is the author “Bearing the Unbearable: Love, Loss, and the Heartbreaking Path of Grief” which won the 2017 Indies Book of the Year Award in self-help and made it into Oprah’s Basket of Favorite Things!

In today’s episode we discuss traumatic grief, and more specifically the experience of losing a child. Joanne shares her own experience of losing her baby daughter, and how this fuelled her desire to help other families going through the same.

Along the way we discuss how losing a child affects the family dynamic and issues such as blame, the importance of grieving rituals, the DSM 5’s misguided approach to grief, and how family and friends can best support a loved one dealing with such an unbearable personal tragedy.

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Related Links

Center for Loss and Trauma – Joanne’s main website

Dr. Joanne Cacciatore’s Facebook Page

The MISS Foundation – A community of compassion and hope for grieving families

Selah Care Farm – The world’s first care farm dedicated to helping those enduring traumatic grief

The National Organisation of Parents of Murdered Children – For the families and friends of those who have died of violence

The Compassionate Friends – Supporting family after a child dies

Book Recommendations

Image courtesy: Paul Sableman

Dr. Vincent J. Felitti

Vincent Felitti is a Clinical Professor of Medicine at University of California, San Diego, and the founder of the Department of Preventive Medicine for Kaiser Permanente, where he served as the chief of preventive medicine for 26 years, during which time his department provided comprehensive medical evaluations to 1.1 million individuals, becoming the largest single-site medical evaluation facility in the western world.

Dr. Felitti has also served on advisory committees at the Institute of Medicine and the American Psychiatric Association.

But he is perhaps most famous for being co-principal investigator of the world famous Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study, a long-term, in-depth, analysis of over 17,000 adults investigating how our emotional experiences during childhood relate to and possibly influence our physical and mental health as adults.

In today’s episode we discuss the history and origins of the Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) study, how childhood trauma can later manifest as physical illness such as cancer and heart disease, why things like obesity and smoking are often protective reactions to childhood trauma, how people with an ACE score 6 or higher have a 5000% greater risk of suicide, and how doctors and mental health professionals can better care for people suffering the consequences of childhood trauma. 

This episode has 10 minutes of bonus content! Subscribe for as little as $2 /month to gain access to this and other exclusive content.

Related Links

ACEs Connection – the most active, influential ACEs community in the world.

ACES Too High – a news site that reports on research about adverse childhood experiences, including developments in epidemiology, neurobiology, and the biomedical and epigenetic consequences of toxic stress.

Book Recommendations

                    

Image courtesy: Linus Eklund

Dr. Stephen Diamond

Dr. Stephen Diamond is a practicing clinical and forensic psychologist specializing in the psychology of creativity, evil, trauma, spirituality and existential life crises.

He is a resident faculty member in the Department of Graduate Psychology at Ryokan College in Los Angeles, and is currently guest editor of the Journal of Humanistic Psychology.

As well as writing a regular blog for Psychology Today, “Evil Deeds: A forensic psychologist on anger, madness and destructive behavior”, Stephen is the author of “Anger, Madness, and the Daimonic: The Psychological Genesis of Violence, Evil, and Creativity”.

Dr. Diamond currently maintains a private psychotherapy practice near Beverly Hills, specializing primarily in Existential Depth Psychology, a unique approach to treatment developed over the past four decades of his career, which he describes as a synthesis of psychodynamic, Jungian and existential therapy.

In this years Christmas episode we explore the issue of bitterness – and the proposed diagnosis of Post-Traumatic Embitterment Disorder (PTED) – by examining the character and story arc of Ebenezer Scrooge from the famous Charles Dickens Christmas tale “A Christmas Carol”.

Along the way we discuss issues related to bitterness such as childhood trauma, romance, grief, nostalgia, meaning, mortality, and personal redemption.

Enjoy this episode?

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Related Links

Evil Deeds – A forensic psychologist on anger, madness and destructive behavior

DrStephenDiamond.com – The website of Dr. Stephen Diamond, clinical and forensic psychologist.

Book Recommendations

          

Image courtesy: Internet Archive Book Images

Juliet Grayson

Juliet Grayson (@CounsellorsCPD) is an psychotherapist, coach and teacher, specialising in working with people with relationship and sexual problems, and people with terminal illness.

She is the author of “Landscapes of the Heart, The Working World of a Sex and Relationship Therapist“, and the director of StopSO (Specialist Treatment Organisation for Perpetrators and Survivors of Sexual Offences), a UK-wide independent network of suitably qualified professionals willing and trained to work with potential sex offenders, sex offenders and their families.

In today’s episode we explore the causes of sexual attraction to minors in adults, what causes a pedophile to move from a sexual attraction to minors to actually committing an offense, how and why we should change public perception towards non-offending pedophiles.

We discuss the importance of providing people who are attracted to children with access to treatment, what therapy for pedophilia consists of and how it can help, and why preventing the first offense is not only more ethical, but more cost effective than punishment.

This episode has 20 minutes of bonus content! Subscribe for as little as $2 /month to gain access to this and other exclusive content.

Related Links

StopSo – Stopping sexual abuse before it starts

StopSo UK Facebook Page

@StopSo_UK on Twitter

There are currently 1,417 victims of sexual abuse EVERY DAY in the UK.

StopSO works with those at risk of sexual offending or reoffending, to enable them to stop acting out, reducing the risk to society and reducing the number of victims.

StopSO relies on public donations and receives no funding from government. Please consider making a donation.

Book Recommendations

                    

Image courtesy: theshutterbug

Dr. Anna Salter

Dr. Anna Salter is a Clinical Psychologist and consultant to the Wisconsin Department of Corrections.

As well as evaluating sex offenders for civil commitment proceedings and other purposes, she lectures and consults on sex offenders and victims throughout the United States and abroad, and has conducted training workshops in all 50 US states and 10 different countries.

She is the author of a number of books, both fiction and non-fiction, including the mystery novel “Prison Blues” which was nominated for a 2003 Edgar Allan Poe Award for best original paperback, and the non-fiction book which forms the basis of today’s conversation “Predators: Pedophiles, Rapists, and Other Sex Offenders… Who they are, how they operate and how we can protect ourselves and our children“.

In today’s episode we explore the psychology of sexual assault from the perspective of both the victims and the perpetrators.

What causes somebody become a sex offender? Are they born that way, or are they the products of culture? Do sex offenders share any characteristics that make them stand out from the crowd? How do perpetrators choose their victims? And is there any hope of redemption for these people?

From the victims perspective we discuss the women who tend to be most vulnerable to sexual assault, why many women who have been sexually assaulted are reluctant to come forward, the manipulation tactics employed by sex offenders to control their victims perception of the assault, and some of the counterintuitive victim behaviours which often lead to perpetrators walking free.

Related Links

AnnaSalter.com – Training, Consulting, and Publications on Sexual Abuse, Sex Offenders, and Victimization

Truth, Lies and Sex Offenders – Anna’s documentary on sexual predators, featuring interviews with some of the sadistic and non-sadistic sex offenders featured in her book “Predators”.

On Self-Respect – Joan Didion’s 1961 Essay from the Pages of Vogue

Book Recommendations

                    

Rape Crisis Support Lines

RAINN (Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network) U.S
The nation’s largest anti-sexual violence organization. operates the National Sexual Assault Hotline, as well as the Department of Defense (DoD) Safe Helpline and carries out programs to prevent sexual assault, help survivors, and to ensure that perpetrators are brought to justice through victim services, public education, public policy, and consulting services.
Call 800.656.4673
https://www.rainn.org/

Rape Crisis England & Wales
A national charity and the umbrella body for a network of independent member Rape Crisis Centres in England and Wales. Find out how to get help if you’ve experienced rape, child sexual abuse or any kind of sexual violence; details of local Rape Crisis services; information about sexual violence for survivors, people supporting survivors, students, journalists & others
Freephone 0808 802 9999
https://rapecrisis.org.uk/

Image courtesy: Luigi Tiriticco

Tom O’Carroll

Tom O’Carroll is a self-confessed pedophile, pro-pedophile advocate, and writer.

He is a former chairman of the now disbanded Paedophile Information Exchange (PIE), an advocacy group that existed from 1974 to 1984 to lobby openly for the legal acceptance of pedophilia.

Tom has faced multiple convictions for pedophile related behavior, including two custodial sentences, the first time in 1981 for conspiracy to corrupt public morals and again in 2006 for the distribution of child pornography.

He is the author of two books, the first being “Paedophilia: The Radical Case”, an autobiographical account of Tom’s early life and involvement with the Pedophile Information Exchange and his beliefs about the nature of adult-child sexual relationships, and his second book, published under the pen name Carl Toms, is “Michael Jackson: Dangerous Liaisons” which argues that the late entertainer’s relationships with young boys were pedophilic in nature.

In today’s episode we delve in to Tom’s early life, the experience of first realizing his sexual attraction to children, his failed attempts to lead a normal life, and his pro-pedophile advocacy efforts.

We debate the nature of consent, whether or not adult-child sexual relationships are always harmful, if childhood sexual trauma is caused by the sexual acts themselves or subsequent societal judgement, and the likelihood of pro-pedophile advocacy ever resulting in a society which accepts adult-child sexual relationships.

Related Links

Heretic TOC – Tom’s WordPress Blog

A Respected Opponent, Not an Enemy – Tom’s blog post about this interview (the comment section may be of interest)

Positive Memories – Cases of positive memories of erotic and platonic relationships and contacts of children with adults as seen from the perspective of the former minor.

Cases in the Research – Consenting Juveniles

Tom’s Recommended Studies

Angelides, S. (2004). Feminism, child sexual abuse, and the erasure of child sexuality. GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, 10(2), 141–177.

Graaf, H. de & Rademakers, J. (2011). The psychological measurement of childhood sexual development in Western societies: methodological challenges. Journal of Sex Research, 48(2), 118-129.

Kershnar, S. (2015). Pedophilia and Adult Child Sex: A Philosophical Analysis. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.

Kilpatrick, A.C. (1992). Long-Range Effects of Child and Adolescent Sexual Experiences: Mores, Myths, Menaces. Hillsdale NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Konker C. (1992). Rethinking Child Sexual Abuse: An Anthropological Perspective. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 62(1), 147-53.

Leahy, T. (1996). Sex and the age of consent: The ethical issues. Social Analysis, 39 (April), 27-55.

Levine, J. (2002). Harmful to Minors: The Perils of Protecting Children from Sex. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.

Lilienfeld, S. O. (2002). When worlds collide: social science, politics, and the child sexual abuse meta-analysis. American Psychologist, 57(3), 176–188.

Martinson, F.M. (1994). The Sexual Life of Children. West Westport, CT: Bergin & Garvey.

O’Carroll, T. (1980). Paedophilia: The Radical Case. London: Peter Owen.

Okami, P. (1991). Self-reports of ‘positive’ childhood and adolescent sexual contacts with older persons: An exploratory study. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 20(5), 437-57.

Prescott, J.W. (1996). The origins of human love and violence. Pre- and Perinatal Psychology

Journal, 10(3), 143-188. The Origins of Peace and Violence: http://www.violence.de/prescott/pppj/article.html Accessed 18 Oct., 2017.

Primoratz, I. (1999). Ethics and sex. London: Routledge.

Rind, B. (2002). The problem with consensus morality, Archives of Sexual Behavior, 31(6), 496-8.

Rind, B., Bauserman, R., & Tromovitch, P. (1998). A meta-analytic examination of assumed properties of child sexual abuse
using college samples. Psychological Bulletin, 124(1), 22–53.

Sandfort, T. (1984) Sex in pedophilic relationships: an empirical investigation among a non-representative group of boys. Journal of Sex Research, 20(2), 123-42.

Wilson, G.D. & Cox, D.N. (1983). The Child-Lovers: A Study of Paedophiles in Society. London: Peter Owen.

 

Book Recommendations

     

Support Lines for Adult Survivors

The National Association for People Abused in Childhood (NAPAC) – UK
Call 0808 801 0331 free from all landlines and mobiles
Monday – Thursday 10:00-21:00 and Friday 10:00-18:00
NAPAC provides a national freephone support line for adults who have suffered any type of abuse in childhood.
Website: www.napac.org.uk

RAINN (Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network)
The nation’s largest anti-sexual violence organization. operates the National Sexual Assault Hotline, as well as the Department of Defense (DoD) Safe Helpline and carries out programs to prevent sexual assault, help survivors, and to ensure that perpetrators are brought to justice through victim services, public education, public policy, and consulting services.
Find help and the resources you need. Call 800.656.4673
https://www.rainn.org/

Support Lines for Children

Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline – U.S. and Canada
Dedicated to the prevention of child abuse. The hotline is staffed 24 hours a day, 7 days a week with professional crisis counselors who—through interpreters—provide assistance in over 170 languages. The hotline offers crisis intervention, information, and referrals to thousands of emergency, social service, and support resources. All calls are confidential. (1-800) 4-A-CHILD or (1-800) 422-4453
https://www.childhelp.org/hotline/

NSPCC – UK
The UK’s leading children’s charity, preventing abuse and helping those affected to recover.
Help for adults concerned about a child: 0808 800 5000
Help for children and young people: 0800 1111
https://www.nspcc.org.uk/

Image courtesy: Ubi Desperare Nescio

Dr. Elaine Hunter

Elaine Hunter is the consultant clinical psychologist and clinical lead of the Depersonalization Disorder Service (DDS) at the South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, and since 1999 has been developing a cognitive behavioural model of DPD.

She is the co-author of “Overcoming Depersonalization and Feelings of Unreality: A self-help guide using cognitive behavioural techniques“, and has written many published papers on the theory and practice of working psychologically with Depersonalisation Disorder.

Dr Hunter has a longstanding interest in international development work including 7 months teaching CBT to Public Health Clinicians in Uganda and Zimbabwe, and helping to set up a psychology service in Sierra Leone for nationals who worked in the Ebola treatment centers during the epidemic.

In today’s episode we explore what it feels like to experience depersonalization (and derealization), whether depersonalization is a symptom of anxiety or the result of a chemical imbalance, common circumstances which can trigger an episode, the cognitive behavioral perspective on how and why depersonalization becomes chronic, and some tips and advice on how to deal with the symptoms.

 

Related Links

What is Depersonalization? – YouTube

Depersonalization Disorder Service at South London and Maudsley NHS – YouTube

The disorder that makes people unable to feel love – BBC Two (Victoria Derbyshire)

Watching the world through a clear fog – BMJ Podcast

Depersonalization Disorder – BBC Radio 2 (Jeremy Vine)

Book Recommendations

     

Images courtesy: Amy Elyse 

 

Glenn Schiraldi, PhD

Dr. Glenn Schiraldi is a graduate of West Point, a Vietnam-era veteran, and founder of Resilience Training International.

Glenn has served on the stress management faculties at The Pentagon, The International Critical Incident Stress Foundation, and The University of Maryland, where he received the Outstanding Teacher Award.

Glenn is also author of a number of books including “The Self-Esteem Workbook“, “The Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Sourcebook“, and the book which forms the basis of today’s discussion “The Resilience Workbook: Essential Skills to Recover from Stress, Trauma, and Adversity“.

In today’s episode we discuss what precisely resilience is and what it means to be resilient, how resilience can act as a barrier that protects us from things like stress, depression and anxiety, and some tips on how you can cultivate and building resilience in yourself.

 

The discipline which makes the soldiers of a free country reliable in battle is not to be gained by harsh or tyrannical treatment. On the contrary, such treatment is far more likely to destroy than to make an army. It is possible to impart instruction and give commands in such a manner and such a tone of voice as to inspire in the soldier no feeling, but an intense desire to obey, while the opposite manner and tone of voice cannot fail to excite strong resentment and a desire to disobey. The one mode or other of dealing with subordinates springs from a corresponding spirit in the breast of the commander. He who feels the respect which is due to others cannot fail to inspire in them respect for himself. While he who feels, and hence manifests, disrespect towards others, especially his subordinates, cannot fail to inspire hatred against himself.

— John M. Schofield

 

Related Links

Resilience Training International – Glenn’s website

How Resilient Are You? – Take Glenn’s Resilience Checkup

Book Recommendations

                         

Image courtesy: Gabriela Fab

 

Jessica Graham

Jessica Graham (@deconstructjg) is an actor, producer, and meditation teacher.

She has appeared in a number of films including “And Then Came Lola”, “Devil Girl”, and “2 Minutes Later” which won her the Best Actress Award at the Tampa International Gay and Lesbian Film Festival.

She is a contributing editor of the popular meditation blog “Deconstructing Yourself“, and the author of the book which forms the basis of today’s discussion, “Good Sex: Getting Off Without Checking Out”.

In today’s episode we explore Jessica’s journey from sexual trauma and disengagement to sexual awakening and spirituality.

We discuss the influence of social media on body image and how different environments can have positive or negative effect on our sexual self-image, common reasons why people feel self-conscious and dissatisfied with their sex lives, the importance of honesty in getting what you want in the bedroom, and how practicing mindfulness between the sheets can lead to a more satisfying sex life.

 

Related Links

Wild Awakening – Dedicated to helping you become more human through psychospiritual evolution, using meditation and self-inquiry.

Mindful Sex with Jessica Graham – Facebook Page

Jessica’s YouTube Channel

Follow Jessica on Instagram

Simple Habit Meditation App – Get two weeks free with this link (for limited time)

Book Recommendations

          

Images (modified) courtesy: Hey Paul Studios (Brain, Gut